PowerPivotPro

PowerPivotPro is Coming to Atlanta

March 20 - 22, 2018

Registration for 2018 Public Training is now open!

AVAILABLE CLASSES

**Use the discount code “3ORMORE” when signing up 3 or more people.

MARCH 20 - 21

Foundations: Power Pivot & Power BI

Instructor: Austin Senseman

Super charge your analytics and reporting skills with Microsoft’s dynamic duo. Designed to handle huge volumes of data, these tools will transform the way you work! Two Days in our class and you are EMPOWERED!

  • Learn Microsoft’s secret weapon behind Power Pivot & Power BI: DAX
  • Taught by Austin Senseman – PowerPivotPro Partner
  • You don’t need to be an IT professional – most of our students come from an Excel background
Atlanta Public Training Classes
Atlanta Public Training Classes

MARCH 20 - 21

Level Up Series: Advanced DAX

Instructor: Ryan Sullivan

The Advanced DAX Course was such a hit in the first half of 2017 that we’ve expanded the course to 2 days!

Overview

  • This advanced DAX training class is taught completely in Power BI Desktop
  • Students are encouraged to take our Foundations course and have hands on experience with the DAX language
  • Taught by Ryan Sullivan – Principal Consultant
  • Class material drawn from usage of Advanced DAX applications while consulting with hundreds of international firms

MARCH 22

Level Up Series: Power Query for Excel & Power BI

Instructor: Ryan Bergstrom

The second class in the series is our Level Up Series is Power Query for Excel & Power BI.

  • Students are encouraged to take our Foundations course and have hands on experience with Power Query in Excel or Power BI Desktop
  • Taught by Ryan Bergstrom – Principal Consultant and Trainer
  • We will cover common to unique business challenges made easy with Power Query’s data wrangling capabilities
  • Intermediate to Advanced Level Power Query best practices distilled into easy to understand patterns to apply to your most common business challenges
Atlanta Public Training Classes
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VLOOKUP better than Relationships? Hell must have frozen over

By Dany Hoter

We always think about a data model with multiple tables and relationships between them as a big improvement over the common practice of combining tables using VLOOKUP expressions.
(Watch Video for more: PowerPivot Relationships are EASIER than VLOOKUP, not just faster)

I came across a customer request that forced me to admit that in some aspects a VLOOKUP is more flexible than relationships. To solve some specific scenarios we have to use modeling methods which are not elegant and not efficient.


VLOOKUP better than Relationships?

I hope that some of the readers will know to defend the cause of the data model and find a magic solution that is both elegant and efficient.

How can good old VLOOKUP be better?

A solution based on VLOOKUP is using a separate formula for every row, this is what makes it cumbersome, slow and error prone – right?

Yes but this is also what makes it more flexible in some cases.

Let’s describe some reasons why is it more flexible and give some examples:

VLOOKUP can use a different way to find the right row based on the input value

=IF(A5=””
, VLOOKUP (A6,lookuptable6,3,false)
, VLOOKUP (A5,lookuptable5,4,false))

If lookup value is empty in our table, there is no point in looking for it in the lookup table and instead a different lookup table is used and a different lookup value is searched for.

For example (download), if a state column is empty or contains “NA”, return a value from the countries table using the country as a search value.


VLOOKUP gives us the flexibility to lookup State or Country names

Read the Rest

Manipulating Relationships in VBA (in 2013)

Guest Post From Dany Hoter

Intro from Rob:  Ah, the international man of mystery returns!  My first instincts when I think of Dany Hoter, other than “one of the most fabulous humans I have ever known,” generally can be summarized as “MDX and Cube Formulas Monster.”

But he’s far from a one-trick pony.  Generally speaking, he has a level of tenacity and patience rarely encountered outside of laboratory conditions.  Couple that with an insatiable drive for The Right Thing, and you get some crazy results.

Today is one such CRAZY example.  Simultaneously, he shows us how to compensate for a drillthrough bug, AND delivers a working example of relationship manipulation via VBA macros.

THIS IS AN ADVANCED TOPIC POST.  Feel free to skip this one.  This is the deep end of the pool and even I don’t swim in these particular waters yet.

Note of course that this technique is 2013 only, and will not work with Power Pivot in 2010.

Take it away, Dany…

A Drillthrough Bug with Inactive Relationships

I started this VBA project after one of our partners wrote to me about a customer complaint regarding inactive relationships in Power Pivot:

image

The Sales Table has TWO Relationships to Calendar – One is Based on OrderDate (Active), and the Other is Based on ShipDate (Inactive – Dashed Line)

 

Read the Rest

Reverse Polarity RELATED()

 

Guest post by Ken Puls

I was recently working on an interesting thing in PowerPivot, and thought I’d share it in case it may help someone… A quick summary of the issue is that I needed to examine multiple records in a child table, and return a single result to the parent table if a condition was present; something that goes against the normal relationship flow.

Scenario Background

I have a file that tracks the purchase and sale of land, as well as the respective property taxes and assessments that we get on an annual basis. It is set up like this:

9-17-2013 2-56-59 PM

At first glance this might look complicated… Each Parcel is assigned a unique Parcel Identifier, known as a PID, a key identifier that will never change for a piece of property.  This info is then used to identify that parcel by the tax authority, the assessment authority, and our appraisers and accounting systems.  In the case above, we can see that the PID from the Parcel table links to the Transaction, Taxes and Assessments tables. From the other side we’ve got the Key_Date that links back to the three tables as well, although it links to TranDate, TaxYear and AssessYear respectively.

Read the Rest

The Dreaded “One to One” Relationship, or Why “Boaring” Movies Are Best

Another Example of “Relationship May Be Needed” When You Do, In Fact, Have a Relationship

Let’s pick up the topic from last week and examine another instance where you might encounter the dreaded warning message above.

Let’s start with this simple pivot:

image

Which is a column from the Years table and a column from the Movies table:

image

But now I have a new table:  Animals, which simply lists, for each year, which Animal is specified by the Chinese Zodiac:

image

Hollywood Insiders Know That the Animals of the Chinese Zodiac Are
Incredibly Important to Box Office Revenues

 

Read the Rest

“Relationship may be needed?” But I already have a relationship! What’s going on?

 
image

“Well I’m not quite ready for a relationship right now Lois.”

A confusing error getting you down?

I got an email this morning from a friend who was running into this problem:

PowerPivot says "Relationship may be needed" - but you do have a relationship.  What's going on?

Are you getting this warning in the field list,
even though you DO have a relationship in place?

What gives?  Let’s return to our recent movies example.

To help you diagnose this problem, should you run into it, first let’s get a simple example ready.

Two tables of data in PowerPivot:  Movies, and Years.

Read the Rest