Connecting To An Oracle Database From Power Pivot

Connecting to an Oracle Database from Power Pivot

Guest Post by Andrew Todd

Intro by Avi: Andrew has been a part of PowerPivotPro family for a while now and has been doing wonders for the clients he has been working with. You have probably heard Rob talk about the “Data Gene”, well Andrew is the ideal specimen for that breed.
Recently I had worked with a client where we spent quite some time just trying to figure out how to connect Power Pivot to their Oracle database. Andrew here lays it all out in simple step by step approach. Andrew’s got a lot of wisdom to share and you should all look forward to more posts from him. Take it away Andrew…

Oracle Databases

The amount of data around us is staggering. Statistics citing the amount of data being generated daily describe it in terms of exabytes (1 exabyte is 1 BILLION gigabytes!) In fact, the amount of data generated daily now exceeds the entire storage capacity of the entire world in 1986!

In a world with that much data, we’re lucky to have tools like Power Pivot and Power Query that offer easy connection to data sources that just sort of … clicks! However, if you’ve tried connecting to an Oracle database in Power Pivot you might have had some trouble. Fear not, here’s how you can make your Oracle database connections click just like all the rest!

Why aren’t my Oracle connections ‘clicking’?

oracle

For Excel pros, Oracle databases are a bit different, because there are a few key connection enabling components that are not automatically included with most users’ setups:

1.) Connection details – for Oracle databases, the connection details are included either in the connection string itself (EZConnect) or in a flat file called TNSnames.ora. Don’t worry, it isn’t as complicated as it sounds! Smile

2.) Oracle data providers – You can think of these as the communication link between Power Pivot and the Oracle database.

Make a Call to your DBA for some details!

DBA to the Rescue

Before you attempt to connect to your Oracle database, you’ll need to contact your friendly Oracle DBA for the following information:

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