PowerPivotPro

PowerPivotPro is Coming to Phoenix

February 20 - 22, 2018

Registration for 2018 Public Training is now open!

AVAILABLE CLASSES

**Use the discount code “3ORMORE” when signing up 3 or more people.

FEBRUARY 20 - 21

Foundations: Power Pivot & Power BI

Instructor: Kellan Danielson

Super charge your analytics and reporting skills with Microsoft’s dynamic duo. Designed to handle huge volumes of data, these tools will transform the way you work! Two Days in our class and you are EMPOWERED!

  • Learn Microsoft’s secret weapon behind Power Pivot & Power BI: DAX
  • Taught by Kellan Danielson – PowerPivotPro Partner and Vice President of Client Services
  • You don’t need to be an IT professional – most of our students come from an Excel background

FEBRUARY 20 - 21

Level Up Series: Advanced DAX

Instructor: Ryan Sullivan

The Advanced DAX Course was such a hit in the first half of 2017 that we’ve expanded the course to 2 days!

Overview

  • This advanced DAX training class is taught completely in Power BI Desktop.
  • Students are encouraged to take our Foundations course and have hands on experience with the DAX language.
  • Taught by Ryan Sullivan – Principal Consultant.
  • Class material drawn from usage of Advanced DAX applications while consulting with hundreds of international firms.

FEBRUARY 22

Level Up Series: Power Query for Excel & Power BI

Instructor: Krissy Dyess

The second class in the series is our Level Up Series is Power Query for Excel & Power BI.

  • Students are encouraged to take our Foundations course and have hands on experience with Power Query in Excel or Power BI Desktop.
  • Taught by Krissy Dyess – PowerPivotPro Principal Consultant and Phoenix native!
  • We will cover common to unique business challenges made easy with Power Query’s data wrangling capabilities.
  • Intermediate to Advanced Level Power Query best practices distilled into easy to understand patterns to apply to your most common business challenges.
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SQL Date Tables in Power Pivot

Guest post by Thomas Allan

SQL to Power Pivot

Intro by Avi: As in Excel, in Power Pivot there are often many ways to accomplish the same thing. For example you can source a Date/Calendar table from Excel, Azure (here and here), Power Query, and SQL (this post). That is usually a sign of strength of the tool.  Although it also makes it more challenging/fun to be able to weigh the options and decide which one works best for you given your situation. Thomas, shows us a cool way to pull Date table from SQL.

Stepping back a bit, there is some good interplay between Power Pivot and SQL. In terms of feeding Power Pivot using SQL – see Why PowerPivot is Better Fed From a Database Part 1 and Part 2. And also Power Pivot being a great addition for SQL savvy folks – see I Know SQL Queries, So Why Do I Need Power Pivot?. Goodness all around, I say 🙂
Take it away Thomas…

Benefits

In addition to often mentioned benefits of using SQL servers as data stores (flexibility, reliability, scalability and security), the benefit of linking to a centralized source that delivers results quickly, consistently to practically any client, anywhere, adds a powerful dimension of “portability“ from the outside of the Excel workbook as Power Pivot and DAX formulas offer on the inside.

Date Table

Four types of resources are often used to create date tables within Power Pivot: 1) Excel itself, using formulas or VBA, 2) data feeds, which you can find an example of following this hyperlink, 3) Power Query, which you can find an example of following this hyperlink, and 4) relational databases.

The example that follows was developed using the relational database SQL Server 2012 and uses only table-valued functions. Although the code was developed on SQL Server 2012, it was also tested on a 2008 release of Microsoft’s flagship database product.

For demonstration purposes, the solution offered here is based on a calendar fiscal year (quarters start January 1, April 1, July 1 and October 1). For other types of calendars, such as 4-4-5 or school semesters, the code can modified by a SQL developer (also, for other types of calendars, some architectural issues may also apply inside Power Pivot, which are fully explained in Rob Collie’s comprehensive Power Pivot course).

This post assumes that the reader has basic familiarity with SQL Server Management Studio, sufficient to install table-valued functions, or has access to someone who knows how to install table-valued functions. This post also assumes familiarity with connecting to a SQL Server database from within Power Pivot (similar to connecting to an Access database).

Download SQL code below.

Read the Rest

Week Ending Date Calculation

Guess Post by Scott Senkeresty at Tiny Lizard

imageJust a quick and practical tip today.

We have a really typical looking Date table.  However, we are going to be drawing some pretty charts summarized by weeks, and our business defines “end of week” at Saturday.  So, we need a new column in our Date table that stores this “Week Ending” date for each row.

The first thought to occur to me was “well, for each Year&WeekOfYear, I just want to grab the max date”.   That sounded easy enough… EARLIER() no longer scares me…

Read the Rest

The GFITW “Loses” an ALL()

 

Yes, We’ve Seen This Image Before and I Am Sure We Will See it Again

Jump in the Wayback Machine…

In the Spring of 2011, I dove into a Power Pivot project that I thought was going to be simple, but even today remains the most complex thing I’ve ever done in DAX.  I think it’s fair to say that the experience, at the time, was traumatizing.  (The client’s business logic itself was/is incredibly complicated.  It’s 100% legitimate, but I think barometric pressure might be factored into their budget/actuals ratios.  Kidding.)

But like many difficult experiences, a lot of good came of it as well:

  1. I learned a ton – it forced me to advance my Power Pivot knowledge significantly
  2. It demonstrated to me that Power Pivot essentially had no “ceiling” – it could handle almost anything
  3. It became a Microsoft case study
  4. It “spawned” the GFITW.

Ah yes, the Greatest Formula in the World.  The solution to all our custom calendar needs, and a pattern I’ve repeated hundreds of times since.  On the blog, in the book, in client workbooks, everywhere.

Well it turns out, the GFITW could afford to go on a diet.

Um, Yeah.  The First ALL Isn’t Necessary (But Doesn’t Cause Problems)

Here’s the “classic” GFITW pattern:

Read the Rest

Traveling into the Future: Measuring Things that Lag

 
How do we compensate for "lagged" data in Power Pivot?

The Red Bars Are Accurately “Tied” to the Months in Which Those Sales Happened,
but the Blue Bars are Four Months “Late.”

Tales from Real Life

So you know, I wrote a book last year.  Being the author, I get reports on how well it’s selling.

What follows is strictly inevitable, considering the people involved and their addictive relationships with data.

Read the Rest

Simplifying Time Calculations and the User Experience using Disconnected Slicers

Guest Post by Jeff Lingen [LinkedIn]

How does PowerPivot fit in an enterprise BI environment

We don’t even know what it is yet. We don’t know what it is. We don’t know what it can be, we don’t know what it will be, we know that it is cool.

Zuckerberg’s early assessment of Facebook was a lot like how I felt after first discovering PowerPivot 3+ years ago. I knew it was cool but had no idea how it would fit into an enterprise business intelligence environment. For a long time PowerPivot for me was just a cool thing that I used for my own data analysis or for proto-typing tools that I would eventually turn into “enterprise-level” solutions. Today I need a pretty compelling reason not to use PowerPivot for almost all of my organization’s analytic requirements. So where does PowerPivot fit into the enterprise BI environment and how do you get associates engaged and use it to provide value?

Read the Rest

Counting “Active” Rows in a Time Period: Guest Post from Chris Campbell

  • image

  • “There’s a Fight Club up in Delaware City.”

  •     “Yeah, I heard.”

  • “There’s one in Penns Grove too.”

  •     “Bob even found one up in New Castle.”

  • “Did you start that one?”

  •     “No, I thought you did.”

 

 

It Keeps Spreading Smile

About a week ago I was talking to Chris Campbell and some of the other folks at Blue Granite.  Chris mentioned that he has been teaching some PowerPivot classes at the Microsoft Technology Centers, sometimes even in my neck of the woods, but I didn’t know until he told me.

Which, of course, instantly reminded me of the scene above in Fight Club.  I’m sure everyone else makes the same connection right? Smile with tongue out

Anyway, Chris asked if I would be interested in him writing a guest post and I said heck yeah!  So, without further delay, I give you the PowerPivotPro.com debut of Chris Campbell.

-Rob

The Problem

Recently, a customer sent me a question regarding a DAX problem they were working on. They have a Members table in their model that includes attributes of “Start Date” and “End Date” for each member. The question they needed to answer was “How many active members did we have in [fill in the blank]?” I thought this was a pretty interesting question and it seemed like it ought to be pretty easy to do in DAX.

Read the Rest