PowerPivotPro

PowerPivotPro is Coming to Phoenix

February 20 - 22, 2018

Registration for 2018 Public Training is now open!

AVAILABLE CLASSES

**Use the discount code “3ORMORE” when signing up 3 or more people.

FEBRUARY 20 - 21

Foundations: Power Pivot & Power BI

Instructor: Kellan Danielson

Super charge your analytics and reporting skills with Microsoft’s dynamic duo. Designed to handle huge volumes of data, these tools will transform the way you work! Two Days in our class and you are EMPOWERED!

  • Learn Microsoft’s secret weapon behind Power Pivot & Power BI: DAX
  • Taught by Kellan Danielson – PowerPivotPro Partner and Vice President of Client Services
  • You don’t need to be an IT professional – most of our students come from an Excel background

FEBRUARY 20 - 21

Level Up Series: Advanced DAX

Instructor: Ryan Sullivan

The Advanced DAX Course was such a hit in the first half of 2017 that we’ve expanded the course to 2 days!

Overview

  • This advanced DAX training class is taught completely in Power BI Desktop.
  • Students are encouraged to take our Foundations course and have hands on experience with the DAX language.
  • Taught by Ryan Sullivan – Principal Consultant.
  • Class material drawn from usage of Advanced DAX applications while consulting with hundreds of international firms.

FEBRUARY 22

Level Up Series: Power Query for Excel & Power BI

Instructor: Krissy Dyess

The second class in the series is our Level Up Series is Power Query for Excel & Power BI.

  • Students are encouraged to take our Foundations course and have hands on experience with Power Query in Excel or Power BI Desktop.
  • Taught by Krissy Dyess – PowerPivotPro Principal Consultant and Phoenix native!
  • We will cover common to unique business challenges made easy with Power Query’s data wrangling capabilities.
  • Intermediate to Advanced Level Power Query best practices distilled into easy to understand patterns to apply to your most common business challenges.
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Microsoft Excel Power Query for self-service BI professionals.

Harness Power Query to Gain Competitive Analysis Insights from LinkedIn

Guest Post by Gil Raviv

Intro: Many experts had proclaimed LongForm Journalism was headed towards extinction in the digital age. In fact it has found a new resurgence and a new audience in the recent years. Thanks to that we can still get articles like This Old Man (featured on NPR’s best Longform Journalism list). This blog post is in the same spirit. This is not a bite-sized learn a cool new trick. We do have tons of those on our site and they’re great. But sometimes you want to sit-down and eat a seven-course meal. Enjoy the feast! Take it away Gil…

In this blog post we will show you how to use Power Query in Excel to import data from LinkedIn and gain amazing competitive analysis insights based on company search. To get your attention right at the start, we will conduct this tutorial and analyze a domain that we all know so well and love – Power Pivot. We will analyze companies who specialize in Power Pivot.

We will show you step by step how to utilize Power Query to extract information from LinkedIn including company size, founding year, location, specialties, and more.

Build your own customized Competitive Analysis Dashboard

When we are done, you can download the workbook, read below how to get LinkedIn access token in this tutorial (Step 1-6), and start using the workbook as your dashboard for competitive analysis. You can use its parameterized queries to search for companies in any domain, refresh the workbook and get a tailor-made dashboard for the competitive posture of your interest.

Before we start, here are few screenshots of what you can get at the end.

Screenshot below shows the world distribution of the 70 companies who specialize in PowerPivot (Created with Power Query and Power Map).
image

Next screenshot shows the distribution of companies by founding year. It’s interesting to see a gradual incline of younger companies who specialize in PowerPivot from 2009 to 2013, and to see a decline in 2014. It seems that last year fewer companies were founded with PowerPivot as a specialty.
image

Next screenshot shows company distribution by Specialty. You can see the most common specialties for companies who specialize in PowerPivot (e.g. Business Intelligence, SQL Server and Excel).
image

I am sure that by now, we got your attention 🙂

Read the Rest

Secret Pot Roast Recipe: Power Query vs. VBA Macros

Guest Post by Willem van Dijk

Intro by Avi: I have never met Willem van Dijk in person, but in my mind he has a persona of a scrappy boxer/standup comedian. A priceless combination. He would have you rolling on the floor no matter what. He brings home the reality of a business user trying to get some business intelligence. Your day job is something else – Finance, Marketing, Accounts, Sales, Product planning etc. But you do what it takes to get the data and analysis that you need. Here’s to the fighting spirit! Take it away Willem…

I love to hate secrets just about as much as I hate to love secrets…

Why? Because knowing a secret is great for the ego, yet too much ego is not great for the soul.
Which is why I love reading posts on PowerPivotPro as it is all about sharing secrets which, in essence, are no longer such.
Ironically, at times what one believes to be a secret often results to be common-knowledge, or worse, common-sense.

In my inaugural post I promised that I would share a Pot-roast recipe (of the secret kind) so here we go…

TopSecretppp

Read the Rest

Tales from the Trenches: My personal experience with Power Update (by Tim Rodman)

Guest Post by Tim Rodman, currently blogging about reporting in Acumatica ERP @ www.AcumaticaReports.com

***Update #1:  a Free Version of Power Update is now available.  More info here.

***Update #2:  There is now a forum for Power Update questions, located here.

Intro from Rob: I’m what you might call a “gift horse optimist” – strongly positive outlook, but when the hoped-for thing finally arrives, I find myself closely inspecting it, testing it, before I trust it enough to advocate it to others.  I went through this same process with Power Pivot itself – I “saw” its gamechanging power in 2010, but it was a full eighteen months before I finally dropped all disclaimers and just started calling it far better – period – than anything we’ve had before.”

Similarly, I’ve long known that Power Update would be a MAJOR win for us in the Power Pivot and Power BI communities.  But I am willing to advocate it now only because I’ve watched others – like Scott, and Tim below – use it successfully, in production environments, in recent months.  (Also see my post last week “introducing” Power Update in case you missed it).

Take it away, Tim…

I first found out about Power Update two months ago via a LinkedIn post by Christian Floyd.

It took me a while to realize that he wasn’t talking about a theoretical future idea, but an actual product, something that exists today. Click the picture below to see the entirety of my foolishness. It wasn’t until I talked to him directly that I realized what Power Update really was and I was immediately interested.

image

He got me a beta version of Power Update and I began testing it at the company I work for: a manufacturing company in Cleveland, OH called The Robbins Company.

Our Background

We started using Power Pivot at The Robbins Company back in 2013 and I wrote about our experience on this blog (click here).

Read the Rest

Introducing Power Update!

Post by Rob Collie

***Update:  check out Scott Senkeresty’s review of Power Update over on Tiny Lizard.

***Update #2:  a Free Version of Power Update is now available.  More info here.

***Update #3:  There is now a forum for Power Update questions, located here.

Power Update: Refresh any Power Pivot / Power BI Workbook, from Any Data Souce, and Publish to Any Location (SharePoint or Otherwise)

A brand-new software utility designed from the ground up as
a “Companion” to  Power Pivot, Power Query, and the entire Power BI stack.

Definitely Click on the Image for Larger Version – Surprises Lurk Therein

Do Any of These Sound Familiar?

Common Problems with Power Pivot and Power BI Scheduled Refresh

Power Update Helps With ALL of These (And a Few More, Too)

“What IS It?”

OK, a few things:

Read the Rest

Power Query for Excel: Combine multiple files of different file types

Guest Post by Miguel Escobar Twitter | Youtube | Blog | Website

Power Query Magic: The Ultimate and easiest way to consolidate multiple tables, sheets, text and/or csv files

Power Query Magic:  The Ultimate and easiest way to consolidate multiple tables, sheets, text and/or csv files
(Click for Full-Size Version)

At some point in the life of an Excel user, we have all faced a similar dillemma. How can I combine multiple sheets, tables, csv or txt files? (can I combine them all together??)

How we used to solve this scenario

Back in the day (before Power Query) we actually had some ways to do so but they were not so user-friendly and they relied heavily on coding or some tedious way of doing it. The most common ways were:

  1. Using SQL Statements to join multiple files
  2. Creating a VBA code that will do the job for me
  3. Going with the tedious way of combining the files manually (perhaps with Excel or Access)

But now we have an easier and optimized way of doing this..let’s find out how

Read the Rest

Power Query Adds SalesForce Connectivity: Totally Awesome, But Trouble Looms Ahead

Post by Rob Collie

SalesForce Data Into Power Pivot / Power BI? YES!

This is what it looks like when Microsoft Does Something Epically Awesome…
…But Dark Clouds Loom – Read on to Learn Why

We LOVE This!

Seriously, we do.  It’s AMAZING.  Multiple of our clients are going to jump all over this.  It’s going to change their culture – AGAIN.

If Power Query can connect to it, that lets you pull SalesForce data directly into Power Pivot.  No more export, save, import/paste/etc.

SalesForce Data Into Power Pivot / Power View? YES!

Power Query Can Import SalesForce Data Directly Into Power Pivot, Which Means You Can Then Visualize in Power View, For Instance

So, the primary point of today’s post is to make you aware of this new capability, and tell you how to get it.

Read the Rest

“I Modified an Existing Table in Power Query and Now it Won’t Refresh”– A Fix

Guest Post by Ted Eichinger

Note, this fix to re-establish a broken connection is performed using Excel 2010

It’s the same old story, I mashed and twisted some data through Power Query, pulled it through Power Pivot, spent hours creating calculated columns and measures, made a really nice Pivot Table with conditional formatting and all the bells and whistles.  Then I show it to the Business Manager that requested it, and he wants me to add a field that I didn’t pull in through Power Query.  I’m going to have to change my Power Query which is going to break my Power Pivot connection, and then I’ll be spending hours to rebuild my model from scratch!

This happens to me more that I’d like.  I’ve searched the far reaches of Google, only to find a lot of threads asking about how to fix, but I’ve never seen an answer.  Most threads end with no,  you just can’t do that.  Just playing around on a hunch, I figured out a way to fix it without having to rebuild the model!!!  Some already know the “fix”, for those that don’t , I’ll walk through the method that’s been working for me.

If you want to follow along download the file below, I’ve used some public data on camera lenses so anyone can refresh the data model (use Anonymous access if prompted), or follow along just using the pictures.
Yes You Can Example.xlsx

In this example a Business Manager wants me to add the field, “Closest Focus” to the Power Pivot table.

Power Pivot Rejected by Business Manager

This is the Power Pivot table that requires an additional field

This should be easy, just open the Power Query (in the example file) named, “Macro photography lenses”, and delete the “RemovedColumns” step and the “Closest Focus” column should now be back.

 Power Query reveal column

“Closest Focus”, has now been added.

Save that Power Query.  Open the Power Pivot window, there is only one table, let’s refresh it.

Power Pivot Error After Editing Power Query

The dreaded Power Pivot error!

This will always happen anytime we make any kind of change to a Power Query that is connected to a Power Pivot table.  If you’re working with Excel Power BI tools you’ll eventually see this error.  The error detail reads:

The operation failed because the source database does not exist, the source table does not exist, or because you do not have access to the data source.

More Details:

OLE DB or ODBC error: The query ‘Macro photography lenses’ or one of its inputs was modified in Power Query after this connection was added. Please remove and re-add the connection. This can be done by disabling and re-enabling download of ‘Macro photography lenses’ in Power Query..

The FIX!!

Read the Rest

Forecasting in Power View and Power BI

Guest Post by Avichal Singh

Intro from Rob:  Never fear, last week’s series is still slated for completion, and in a special way.  Watch this space on Thursday for some fireworks.  For now, please enjoy Avi’s thoughts on the new forecasting component of Power View / Power BI.

PASS Business Analytics conference saw the announcement of a pretty cool Power View feature: Forecasting. I felt lucky to have been there and also to have had the opportunity to attend both of Rob Collie’s sessions (Data Revolution, Industrial Strength Excel). The Data Revolution session, I must say, was unlike anything I expected. No DAX formulas, no bullet points; just a path to data nirvana Smile

The Power View forecasting feature was cool enough that I just had to play with it! I wanted to try it out with a few real world data sets. I ended up using Climate Data and Stock Market performance.

– First a quick look at the Power View forecasting functionality
– Then I show you how I built the files using Power Query (The more I use that tool the more I like it)

You can find the link to the finished Excel file here. You can also watch me walk through the whole process in the video below:

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-rqQBJFMofw&hl=en&hd=1]
Video Walkthrough: Forecasting in Power View and Power BI

Power View Forecasting in a Nutshell

In the ‘cloud first’ spirit that Microsoft has been following, the forecasting feature is only available in the online Power BI site (See microsoft.com/powerbi for more and to sign up for a free trial). To enable the forecasting feature, after opening your file on the Power BI site, you need to switch to the HTML5 mode by clicking on the icon at bottom right.

clip_image001 Click on this icon to enable the HTML5 mode with forecasting functionality

Power View Forecasting in a Nutshell

Read the Rest