Coffee Talk

This Week’s Topic: Power Query

NOTE: There’s a moment in this talk where the team speculates about the future of Power Query and how it really should be *the* ETL tool everywhere for Microsoft. Since the time of this conversation, Microsoft has snuck Power Query into Power Apps (https://powerapps.microsoft.com/sl-si/tutorials/data-platform-cds-newentity-pq/). So this coffee talk is also a crystal ball talk. If you think the future is already written then being a genius means being able to see the future before everyone else. An Indian man told me that in a little restaurant right by the Taj Mahal just a few months ago, and here I am sharing it with you. Enjoy! –Austin

Warning this is a THREE Microsoft MVP conversation – proceed with caution 🙂 Welcome to an experimental new feature here at PowerPivotPro, where members of the community discuss various topics related to Power BI, Power Pivot, and Analytics/BI in general. These conversations take place during the week on a Slack channel, and are then lightly edited for publishing on Friday. In our 2nd installment of our Coffee Talk series we’ll be chatting with three Power Query Pros. Let’s introduce the folks we brought in for this week’s Coffee Talk:

Ken Puls, aka ExcelGuru, Microsoft MVPPower Query maestro extraordinaire, and along with Miguel Escobar the brains behind our Power Query video course (Power Query Online Training). Ken runs a consultancy firm, Excelguru, and the associated blog https://www.excelguru.ca/blog/ where he and his team share world class advice and insight on all things Power Query. If you ever see Rob Collie and Ken Puls together with beers in their hands, find a way to join the conversation.

Imke Feldman, aka TheBIccountant, Microsoft MVPself-employed BI consultant with a special love for Power Query. Having worked in various finance-positions before, she now enjoys transforming hard-to-manage old-style Excel solutions to the new world. On her blog www.TheBIccountant.com she shares some of her concepts and if you’re looking for help in Microsoft’s Power Query- & Power BI communities there is a good chance to come across her solutions too.

Gil Raviv, Microsoft MVP, Blogger at DataChant, Analytics Group Manager at Avanade. As a former Senior Program Manager on the Microsoft Excel Product team, Gil led the design and integration of Power Query in Excel 2016, and became an extreme M practitioner. At Avanade, Gil helps large organizations to join the data revolution and adopt Power BI (work with Gil). At P3 we lovingly refer to Gil as “the consultant that got away.” 🙂

Austin Senseman, VP Operations here at PowerPivotPro, trying to keep this company running like a well-oiled machine

Introductions

austin
2017-07-11 15:23
@austin set the channel purpose: We’re getting the best PQ minds in the industry together to discuss “Why should you be paying attention to PQ?!”. We’ll also be discussing what folks need to know about the tool and what Microsoft can do to improve the PQ experience. Enjoy!

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 13:53
has joined #coffeetalk_powerquery

 

imke
2017-07-11 14:21
has joined #coffeetalk_powerquery

 

gilra
2017-07-11 14:27
has joined #coffeetalk_powerquery

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 15:25
G’morning

 

gilra
2017-07-11 15:26
Good morning :slightly_smiling_face:

 

imke
2017-07-11 15:27
Good afternoon :slightly_smiling_face:

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 15:27
So where are you both based now?

 

austin
2017-07-11 15:28
so 75% morning, 25% afternoon …

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 15:28
Lucky me, I’ve still got the whole day ahead. :stuck_out_tongue:

 

gilra
2017-07-11 15:28
40 minute drive north to Chicago

 

imke
2017-07-11 15:28
2 minute walk to the beach in the Baltic :slightly_smiling_face:

 

gilra
2017-07-11 15:29
Aren’t the waters cold there?

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 15:29
Takes me about 10 to walk to the Pacific. 😉

 

gilra
2017-07-11 15:29
So we are all fishers?

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 15:29
Pacific is, yes, but probably no colder than the great lakes

 

imke
2017-07-11 15:29
Very pleasant now

 

gilra
2017-07-11 15:29
I am 10 minutes drive from Lake Michigan

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 15:30
I haven’t fished in years Gil. But we’ve got lots of fishing out here

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 15:30
Sometimes you have to fight the seal for your salmon though

 

austin
2017-07-11 15:30
haha, I’m the only person here close to an ocean that you’d actually want to get in

 

gilra
2017-07-11 15:30
Fishers of insights

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 15:30
LOL

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 15:30
Austin, where are you? Florida?

 

austin
2017-07-11 15:30
Alabama

 

austin
2017-07-11 15:31
anybody taken the @datafish twitter handle Ken?

 

gilra
2017-07-11 15:31
Great idea Austin!!!

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 15:31
I haven’t noticed that handle…

Power Query? Get & Transform?

austin
Let’s get this started with a question that I know everyone is wondering about …

austin
2017-07-11 15:32
what do you guys call this tool that we’re talking about today?

 

imke
2017-07-11 15:32
PowerQuery

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 15:32
Yes, there is a datafish on twitter

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 15:32
I call it PowerQuery

 

gilra
2017-07-11 15:32
It took me days in late 2015 to find a suffix for “data”. Didn’t think of a fish back then.

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 15:32
Whether I’m in Excel or Power BI

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 15:32
LOL @gilra

 

gilra
2017-07-11 15:33
But do you know what is the chant of data?

 

austin
2017-07-11 15:33
haha, go on

 

gilra
2017-07-11 15:33
MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM

 

austin
2017-07-11 15:34
that’s great

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 15:34
Groan

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 15:34
So @austin my take… just because Microsoft hasn’t figured out the tool is called Power Query, doesn’t mean it isn’t. It needs an identity since it has it’s own formula language and M doesn’t cut it.

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 15:34
Despite Gil’s chanting. 😉

 

austin
2017-07-11 15:34
@gilra do you also call the tool PowerQuery?

 

gilra
2017-07-11 15:35
I do

 

gilra
2017-07-11 15:35
And it’s funny that Microsoft started to call it Get & Transform

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 15:35
See I don’t think they really called it that. They just put it under that button and de-branded it…

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 15:36
It was never really a brand name at all there

 

gilra
2017-07-11 15:36
Back at Microsoft when I was the PM working on the renaming (and don’t hate me for that), we used the term Get & Transform for the section in the ribbon only, to describe the action, and not the feature.

 

austin
2017-07-11 15:37
ok so we know who to blame for this now

 

gilra
2017-07-11 15:37
I was only the foot soldier 😉

 

austin
2017-07-11 15:37
:slightly_smiling_face:

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 15:37
That’s my point Gil. It was de-branded, not re-branded.

 

gilra
2017-07-11 15:37
Right

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 15:37
I’ve heard one softie say that it should never have been branded in the first place. It should have just been added as a new feature in Excel

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 15:38
I tend to disagree only because it has it’s own formula language and needs a search term

M is for Making Lemonade from Lemons

austin
2017-07-11 15:39
so just because the conversation is headed here, how do you feel about the “M” name? It’s pretty hard to search for on the web.

 

imke
2017-07-11 15:39
I think the fact that we now have at least 4 different “languages” in Excel is a bit of a challenge for the marketing guys…

 

gilra
2017-07-11 15:39
It was part of a bigger move to strengthen the brand Power BI. You can extrapolate that in the future we will find the same debranding for Power Pivot.

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 15:40
Sure @imke, but we have VBA, DAX, XML, and formulas. In fact, we also have Custom Number Formats too. But each has a distinct term that can be searched for. Searching Google (or Bing) for a letter is brutal

 

austin
2017-07-11 15:41
it would have been better to call the language “brutal”, from an SEO perspective

 

gilra
2017-07-11 15:41
Regarding M – I was told by a colleague that M is now the official name. Here is the relevant youtube video of the announcement from Microsoft Data Insights Summit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ecfRTEoYadI (But I never watched it, so I cannot confirm).

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 15:41
@gil, de-branding Power Pivot would actually be less impactful as we have a “Data Model”, “Relationships”, “Measures” and “DAX” which are all distinct terms

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 15:41
Yes, M is the official name. Search Google for M. <rolls eyes>

 

imke
2017-07-11 15:41
I didn’t mean that with regards to the searchablilty, but with regards to the demands towards training and the need to invest time to build up your skills

 

gilra
2017-07-11 15:42
There are few M movies :slightly_smiling_face:

 

imke
2017-07-11 15:42
I’ve watched it and it’s now officially called M

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 15:42
But I think that the awareness and search ability is the key @imke. If you don’t become aware that there is a tool under that language, how can you learn more about it?

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 15:43
I think MS got the need here, and took action, but I honestly believe they missed the entire point on needing the name.

 

imke
2017-07-11 15:46
So if we believe that M will conquer the world, it might soon work as good as R :slightly_smiling_face:

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 15:46
R is a silly name as well. 😉

 

gilra
2017-07-11 15:46
I think that MS are trying first to simplify the experiences (e.g. Column from Examples, Create Function), and until they provide intellisense in the formula bar and Advanced Editor, Microsoft can call this language supercalifragilisticexpialidocious, the damage is the same.

The Elevator Pitch for PQ

austin
2017-07-11 15:47
haha, i’m enjoying this conversation a lot. M is an ambiguous name for sure (still like PQL myself). But let’s switch over and talk about why start using Power Query – when you describe it to someone who’s never used it, what do you say? what’s the elevator pitch? Do you even mention M?

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 15:47
That’s a fair point Gil, but one issue… until they give us those tools, the need for users to be able to find help is huge.

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 15:47
No Austin, I don’t mention M

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 15:47
In a perfect tool, the user never needs to get messy with the language. it should be user interface driven

 

imke
2017-07-11 15:49
PowerQuery makes it super-easy to import all the data you need. And once you have it at your fingertips so quickly, you can easily perform your calculations in there as well instead of in Excel.

 

gilra
2017-07-11 15:49
In an elevator pitch, it depends on the audience. In Self-Service scenarios I mention the new Excel

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 15:50
I generally deal with Finance people. For them I show (or describe) the ASCII text file that is formatted only to print on a dot matrix printer, then ask them how much time they spend cleaning it up every month end. Then I tell them that I can teach them to do it once and refresh it in seconds next month.

 

imke
2017-07-11 15:51
Agree with the user interface driven. Very much welcoming the progress MS is making with columns from example (for example 😉 ). Ppl have enough to do in their daily jobs and using the (new) tools should be as easy and smooth as possible

 

austin
2017-07-11 15:51
@datamonkey that approach earns the highest award offered in the coffee talk series, the coffee emoji :coffee:

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 15:52
ha!

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 15:52
All accountants can identify with that example

 

gilra
2017-07-11 15:53
At Avanade, I also meet with many people from IT who are looking for Data Governance, and long term analytics projects. For them I do mention M (but not in the elevator 🙂 M + the amazing UI of the Query Editor is a powerful self-service ETL tool which allows us to be agile and start proof of concepts for bigger projects.

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 15:53
@imke I’m looking forward to when that feature is more reliable. I generally find I pick on something that doesn’t work when I’m trying to demo it. :disappointed:

 

imke
2017-07-11 15:54
Yes, I’m talking more about the idea here, as I’m not using it. But this would be ideal if it would work.

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 15:54
Actually @gilra, that is my main pitch in a PQ training session: This is an ETL prototype. Once it becomes mission critical you should go back to IT and say “see how much work I have to do? Can’t you just give me a View on the server?”

Interested in Learning How to Do this Kind of Thing?

power query

Our New Online Power Query Course just launched this year. You’ll learn Power Query from the best in the business, two Excel MVPs Ken Puls and Miguel Escobar. We’ve included 7 Hours of Self-Paced Video over 31 Courses, with lots of example files, and a Digital Badge powered by Acclaim.

CLICK HERE to claim your spot.


 

Is PQ a Replacement for Traditional ETL? A Complement?

austin
2017-07-11 15:54
how should traditional ETL folks view PQ?

 

gilra
2017-07-11 15:55
Traditional ETL should learn it today!!!

 

austin
2017-07-11 15:55
as a replacement? as a prototype? as just another option in the toolbox?

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 15:55
I’m of mixed emotions on this…

 

gilra
2017-07-11 15:55
In the near future, I am sure as a replacement for many projects

 

imke
2017-07-11 15:56
Given the fact that custom connectors are written in M, that alone can be a reason.

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 15:56
I think that PQ is awesome for Excel and Power BI analysts to clean up and prototype their data. Having said that, it is not the best in class for ETL solutions

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 15:57
The performance is poor and the auditing tools are very lacking, which true ETL processes have. But contrast that with the fact that it is built in to the product

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 15:57
I think PQ (and M) will show up in many tools, which will make it VERY important to learn, but I sincerely hope that we are in the very early days of the tool

 

gilra
2017-07-11 15:58
We are not at prime time yet, but the fact that you will soon be able to deploy Power Bi reports with Gigabytes of data (using the premium capacity units), means that Power BI Desktop can become the primary tool for report authors (including ETL developers).

 

imke
2017-07-11 15:59
Yes, performance is THE primary pain for me as well. But I cannot see why this should continue to be so. Very much hoping that this will become more transparent and manageable in the future.

 

gilra
2017-07-11 16:00
You will always need the ETL tools and Analysis Services for 20% of the solutions, but for the 80%, I think you will be able to do everything by Power BI Desktop.

 

gilra
2017-07-11 16:00
@imke when you refer to performance, is it the refresh time?

 

imke
2017-07-11 16:01
Yes

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 16:01
@gilra the refresh time, the construction time as well

Suggestions for Future Development

austin
2017-07-11 16:01
this is really interesting, say yall are sitting down with the PQ managers at Microsoft, what suggestions would you have for them regarding the roadmap _in the long term_?

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 16:01
the fact that every step added causes a refresh in the PQ preview at design time is BRUTALLY painful when you are working on a large text file based data set

 

imke
2017-07-11 16:01
Create a mechanism where custom functions can be uploaded and used as if they were internal/inbuilt functions. Let us adjust the user interface in the query editor, so that we can place custom functions there.

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 16:01
@austin it’s time to focus on performance

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 16:02
I would happily stop all development on PQ for 2 years to get the performance issues addressed

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 16:02
And I’m completely serious about that

 

austin
2017-07-11 16:02
@datamonkey i had a follow-up about what you’d suggest that they do right now, in the very short term, so let’s pretend for a second that was solved

 

imke
2017-07-11 16:03
@Ken: Agree, we need tools to analyse performance and options to manage it

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 16:03
So @austin, you want ideas for new enhancements?

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 16:04
Fuzzy Lookup would be amazing to have

 

imke
2017-07-11 16:04
Incremental load

 

gilra
2017-07-11 16:04
I think they can invest more time in data exploration experience

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 16:04
Yes, @imke , that would be huge

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 16:05
How so @gilra?

 

imke
2017-07-11 16:05
Export to csv so we can create write-backs to ERP-systems or other databases

 

gilra
2017-07-11 16:05
The preview and ad-hoc transformations allow you to learn new things of your data, before you know which report to create.

 

gilra
2017-07-11 16:05
For example, how many times did you use the Remove Duplicates just to learn more about the data?

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 16:05
@imke, you can do that with Excel. Just takes a little VBA

 

austin
2017-07-11 16:06
@imke i love that idea

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 16:06
@gilra Um… never. LOL! I use Remove Duplicates to create dimension tables to avoid many-many lookups for Power Pivot all the time

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 16:06
(but that doesn’t mean it’s not valid)

 

imke
2017-07-11 16:07
@datamonkey But I don’t want to load to Excel before loading to csv. Or didn’t I understand you correctly?

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 16:08
@imke you did. You’re focusing on Power BI Desktop, correct? In Excel I have cooked up write-back scenarios with clients using Power Query and VBA. If you’re in PBI, you’re stuffed as there is no extensibilty model to tap into

 

imke
2017-07-11 16:08
@gilra Do you have a specific user-group in mind for this?

 

gilra
2017-07-11 16:09
When we start with a single big table, and would like to split it to fact and lookup tables, can the Query Editor be designed to help us understand the nature of our data? Which columns have duplicates, etc.

 

gilra
2017-07-11 16:10
@imke not sure I follow user-group to share the ideas?

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 16:10
@gilra True enough. I think we do the same thing, I just don’t know that I think of (or describe it) using the same terms you do.

 

gilra
2017-07-11 16:11
@imke write back is a great missing functionality

 

gilra
2017-07-11 16:11
Which brings a great idea –

 

gilra
2017-07-11 16:11
Imagine that the Query Editor will be used on any Microsoft product/service which requires data preparation

 

gilra
2017-07-11 16:11
Even Microsoft Flow, or Power Apps

 

imke
2017-07-11 16:12
@gilra Starting to understand where you’re coming from. I’m very much focused on finance people and there the imported data is no such “unknown” territory. But I can imagine use cases where this makes sense: When you’re touching new data. Imagining journalists here for example.

 

gilra
2017-07-11 16:12
And Azure Machine Learning

 

imke
2017-07-11 16:12
@gilra don’t have enough thumbs up on this one :slightly_smiling_face:

 

austin
2017-07-11 16:12
yep @gilra that’s what I meant re: long term roadmap for the tool

 

gilra
2017-07-11 16:13
@imke in the Consulting world (which is still new to me) I meet many people from different industries. The data is always new, and they don’t have time to teach me.

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 16:14
I already see PQ starting to move towards that “one language to ETL them all” phase. It’s in Excel and Power BI, and has moved into some of the servers. I would not surprise me to see this become “the” language that hits many touchpoints and programs

 

gilra
2017-07-11 16:14
Here is another idea – Create a series of steps in a single operation to solve common patterns

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 16:15
@gilra I wish we could package those and share them. Kind of the custom function idea that @imke floated earlier

 

austin
2017-07-11 16:15
Let’s switch gears for the folks reading this and clear up a few more things about the M language … related to Gil’s last point

M is to PQ, like VBA is to Excel

austin
2017-07-11 16:15
Each of you has carved out a space where you’re considered experts in “M” but based on some previous comments sounds like you wish you didn’t need to use “M” – am i hearing that right? Additionally, I use PQ a lot and I almost NEVER write M – what am I missing?

 

gilra
2017-07-11 16:15
For example – You have a nasty table in Excel with many nested columns and rows, you click the button in the ribbon and Excel will Unpivot it

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 16:16
M to PQ is like VBA to Excel. In Excel you can do a great many things without ever touching VBA. In fact, you never need to learn it. But when you do, you can do much more. Same is true for M. If you learn it you open up doors to do more things that you can’t necessarily do through the UI.

 

imke
2017-07-11 16:16
@datamonkey & @gilra : Yes – that’s what I meant.

 

gilra
2017-07-11 16:18
@austin I use M a lot, but only when I cannot use the UI. The reason is the lack of intellisense. I was a developer in my past experience (C++, Java, C#), and too lazy to write code from scratch, if I don’t need to.

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 16:19
LOL! I love writing code.

 

gilra
2017-07-11 16:19
For my clients and readers of DataChant.com, I show M only when it’s necessary. And always as means to refine and scale up the transformation

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 16:19
But I agree that the lack of intellisense is a killer. I find myself copying code out to Notepad or Notepad++ just to do find/replace. It’s a brutal environment. Reminds me of writing HTML when there were no tools.

 

gilra
2017-07-11 16:20
@datamonkey I am even too lazy to install Notepadd++

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 16:20
Agreed @gilra. When I put out my posts on my blog at http://www.excelguru.ca, I try to do everything from a UI perspective and show the code only when necessary.

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 16:21
I * try *. LOL!

 

imke
2017-07-11 16:21
If you’re “just” preparing reporting data to push into PowerPivot / the data model, I can understand that you don’t write M-code. But if you’re instead using it to perform calculations that you’d otherwise would have done in Excel, you need the extended possibilities that writing code gives you.

 

austin
2017-07-11 16:21
alright, everyone flash their blog url!

 

gilra
2017-07-11 16:21

 

gilra
2017-07-11 16:22
It was a nightmare to move to HTTPS by the way :slightly_smiling_face:

 

imke
2017-07-11 16:22
Also you can improve existing inbuilt-functions using M-code or build new ones. And there we are again: Making those available as if they were inbuilt-functions :slightly_smiling_face:

 

imke
2017-07-11 16:22

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 16:23
Oh, that’s what I did wrong… and yes @gilra, moving the site to https was a pain. let’s try this again; https://excelguru.ca/blog

 

austin
2017-07-11 16:23
boom!

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 16:23
@imke agreed!

 

gilra
2017-07-11 16:24
@imke you are also the BI Countess, consider buying this domain: http://thebicountess.com

Closing Statements

austin
2017-07-11 16:25
Haha ok let’s move to wrapping this up, closing statements from the three of you. In this order, @gilra, @imke, @datamonkey

 

gilra
2017-07-11 16:25
@austin you caught me by surprise :slightly_smiling_face:

 

austin
2017-07-11 16:25
just speak from your heart

 

austin
2017-07-11 16:30
there is a 10,000 word limit

 

gilra
2017-07-11 16:31
Power Query, M, G&T, Query Editor, the tool of many names, the changer of my professional life, is an amazing technology and experience. There are probably ~100M people that prepare and clean data in their daily job, and 900M more people are directly affected by the work of the former group. I think it’s a great opportunity for everyone in the data business to learn PQ, and take part of this revolution. We are lucky to be here from the early days, and be here to empower so many people.

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 16:31
@austin… damn. Now you tell me!

 

gilra
2017-07-11 16:31
Slack is missing a word count feature

 

austin
2017-07-11 16:31
@gilra you’re right! those are very inspiring words, thanks

 

imke
2017-07-11 16:32
PowerQuery is the best thing that happened to Excel ever. It will transform/disrupt the way finance people will work with Excel and shut down Excel hell forever.

 

austin
2017-07-11 16:32
@imke yes!

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 16:32
Even in companies where they have a culture of letting their analysts talk to curated databases (still sadly rare), there is always other data that needs to be brought in and married into any solution. Power Query lets us do that with ease, with little (if any) coding, and that is why I love the tool so much.

 

gilra
2017-07-11 16:32
Sometimes I am tempted to blog a post with the title: Excel is Dead, Long live Excel (The new one with PQ)

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 16:32
LOL

 

imke
2017-07-11 16:33
@gilra Cannot wait for it!

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 16:34
I need to get another blog post out. Been too long… :disappointed:

 

gilra
2017-07-11 16:34
Oh, and @austin, please tell Rob that people should start learning M first. Not DAX. Just kidding :slightly_smiling_face:

 

austin
2017-07-11 16:34
oh goodness, i really tried to avoid that conversation!

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 16:34
LOL

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 16:34
I had that conversation with him over beers @gilra. It think that we both think we won

 

austin
2017-07-11 16:35
:slightly_smiling_face:

 

austin
2017-07-11 16:35
I want to offer sincere thank yous to the three of you. You have and continue to inspire lots of people. You’ve been generous with your time and knowledge. This has been a real pleasure and I look forward to picking this conversation up again later this year.

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 16:35
Cheers, thanks everyone!

 

gilra
2017-07-11 16:35
Thank you Austin for the opportunity to chat together. We should do it often!

 

imke
2017-07-11 16:36
Thank you @austin for this chance – enjoyed it very much and looking forward to the next meeting!

 

gilra
2017-07-11 16:36
@imke @datamonkey – Love your work!!!

 

datamonkey
2017-07-11 16:37
Thanks @gilra! And glad you’re out in the field lending another voice now too!

 

imke
2017-07-11 16:37
Same to you guys!!

 

imke
2017-07-11 16:37
Cheers & bye!

 

gilra
2017-07-11 16:38
Goodbye
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Austin Senseman

Austin spent the last five years using Modern Excel in the field to solve analytical challenges for the financial services industry, first at BBVA and later at Harbert Management Corporation. As a former analyst, Austin is focused on enabling other data professionals to experience the joys of Power Pivot & Power BI. Austin is a CFA Charterholder, former CPA, Excel Power User, and SQL Server Professional, whose involvement in data/analytics projects lowers the communication costs between business users and IT professionals and helps organizations get to solutions faster. 

This Post Has 7 Comments

  1. I couldn’t live without PQ – found it about 18 months back and now use it nearly every day to get myself the answers to many random data requests.
    my one gripe is performance with large data tables and multiple queries – I heard about table.buffer, but cannot find out how to use this!!

  2. Really enjoyed reading through this. I agree that more data exploration would be amazing inside of PQ – Azure ML does this well, at every step you can visualize the dataset and get a few summary statistics. As well, the “Summarize Data” node in Azure ML gives a ton of information about all of the features. It would be awesome to be able to right click on a certain step in the PQ interface and be able to ask for a similar data summary.

    This is especially painful in Power BI because you can’t filter in the data view like you can in Power Pivot!

  3. It did not take long for me to start really digging this “experimental feature.” Missed the 1st installment so this was new to me. Distinguished guests, great discussion. Interesting and thought provoking. Keep it up.

  4. M. Microsoft should have already cleared that against the existing MUMPS programming language found under ANSI x11. That language is also referred to as “M”.

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